Tag: Agriculture and nature

The Soul of the White Ant

Eugene Marais
Paperback, Kindle


“As a safari Guide in the Okavango Botswana for many years, I used this book as a basis for presenting a fascination for the smaller creatures of the African bush, my home for my entire life and which I was privileged to share with many clients from different countries. Termite mounds are really interesting and Eugene Marais compared the infrastructure of a termitary to that of the human body. Writing from the heart, this scientific author instils a wonder in the reader, of the incredible intricacies of nature, in a light-hearted, easily readable manner.”


“Excellent read – astonishing for it’s time. A heartfelt and truly holistic/metaphysical observation of how the colony functions which is deeply thought provoking…”

Ten Acres is Enough

Edmund Morris
Paperback, Kindle


“Recently we have seen a great back-to-the-land movement, with many young professional people returning to small scale farming; thus it is great fun to read about someone who did exactly the same thing in 1864. In that year, Mr. Edmund Morris gave up his business and city life for a farm of ten acres, made a go of mixed farming and then wrote a book about it. Mr. Morris proves Abraham Lincoln’s prediction: ‘The greatest fine art of the future will be the making of a comfortable living from a small piece of land’.” – Sally Fallon, The Weston Price Foundation

Reconstruction By Way of the Soil

Dr Guy Wrench
Paperback, Kindle, epub


“Nothing is more important and fundamental than the relationship between civilization and the soil. Guy Wrench takes us through the history of some of the world’s most important civilizations, concentrating on the relationship between humanity and the soil. He shows the reader how farming practices, and the care – or lack of care – with which the soil is treated have brought about both the rise and fall of civilizations, from the ancient Romans, to the Chinese, and the Muslim world.”

Friend Earthworm

George Oliver
Paperback


“George Oliver returns the reader to a time and methodology where people took responsibility for what they did and what they produced. In this world of spiraling food prices, huge landfills, diminishing food supplies, loss of topsoil, and water pollution, the reader is gently chastised for “letting someone else do it” and being “just too busy.” We were once a self-reliant nation; now we outsource. Oliver shows the reader what is wrong and why. And the book is about earthworms.”